Deleting the old kernels lost on your hard drive

Conclusions

Automatic management of the kernel packages is typically fine for normal use, but automatic systems sometimes show some weaknesses. Manually installed kernel packages are usually not governed by the automatic mechanisms. If you manually install kernel packages on the disk, it makes sense to search the system for obsolete packages from time to time. If you need disk space in a hurry and can do without the previous kernel versions, removing large kernel packages will help in the short term.

The Author

Roman Jordan has been working with Linux for over 20 years. His main focus is on the Linux kernel and on programming small embedded platforms.

Buy this article as PDF

Express-Checkout as PDF
Price $2.95
(incl. VAT)

Buy Linux Magazine

SINGLE ISSUES
 
SUBSCRIPTIONS
 
TABLET & SMARTPHONE APPS
Get it on Google Play

US / Canada

Get it on Google Play

UK / Australia

Related content

  • Kernel Tips

    Worried about a recent security exploit? Want to take advantage of a new hardware feature? You don’t need to be a Linux expert to patch and compile the Linux kernel. We'll show you how to get started.

  • Manjaro and Antergos

    Manjaro and Antergos put the power of Arch Linux in a beginner-friendly form.

  • Working with the Kernel

    If you work with third-party hardware drivers, or even if you just need to fix a broken system, someday you might need to upgrade the Linux kernel.

  • Tutorials – Build the Linux Kernel

    Get a super-customized Linux installation by configuring and compiling the kernel with just the features you need.

  • DKMS: Dell Improves Driver Installation

    Version 2.0.17.4 DKMS (Dynamic Kernel Module Support), a framework that facilitates the installation of Linux drivers, has just been released. Besides bugfixes the new release includes a method for creating Debian driver packages.

comments powered by Disqus

Direct Download

Read full article as PDF:

Price $2.95

News