Productivity Sauce

Dmitri Popov
Host Media Content with linx-server

Jan 19, 2016 GMT

Another week, another file hosting web application. This time it's linx-server, an app written in Go that has several things going for it. For starters, linx-server can handle mixed content: besides images, it can be used to host videos and publish text snippets. And since the app supports syntax highlighting for many popular languages, you can enlist it for pastebin duties. When adding content, you can enable the expiration option for each item, so the files are automatically removed after a specified period of time. linx-server supports a handful of configuration options, and you can tweak the app's basic settings such as port, site name,...
Instant Mindmapping with MindMapIt

Jan 14, 2016 GMT

Mindmapping -- you either love it or hate it. In case you belong to the former camp, you might want to add MindMapIt to your productivity toolbox. This simple web app lets you create mindmaps on the fly without leaving the convenience of your favorite browser. Since MindMapIt is a mix of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, it requires no installation, and it will happily run in any browser. Clone the project's GitHub repository, open the index.html file in a browser, and you are good to go. Of course, you can also deploy MindMapIt on a web server if you prefer to access it via the web. MindMapIt is not exactly overloaded with features, and it's...
Classeur: A Classy Markdown Editor

Jan 07, 2016 GMT

There are probably as many Markdown editors out there as there are bugs in a rain forest. So building yet another editor that supports the popular text formatting markup seems like a royal waste of time. Nevertheless, the developers behind Classeur have managed to produce a Markdown editor that is nothing short of phenomenal. Classeur is available as an installable browser app for Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome. The app works offline, so you don't need a network connection for it to work. The first thing you'll notice when you launch the editor is its polished and highly functional interface. Indeed, after poking around the editor, it becomes apparent that Classeur's developers paid a...
Temporary File Hosting with Uguu

Jan 06, 2016 GMT

Most of us need to share large files every now and then. So a service like Uguu that allows you to do that with a minimum of fuss can be a welcome addition to your toolbox. As you would expect, Uguu is supremely simple to use. Upload a file (the service supports files up to 100MB in size), and share the automatically generated link with the file's intended recipients. Uguu stores uploaded files only temporarily, and the service deletes them automatically after 24 hours. This simple creature comfort ensures that none of your shared files linger on the web longer than necessary. Uguu is written in PHP, and the software is available on...
Push Notifications from the Command Line to Android

Dec 22, 2015 GMT

If you want to send notifications from a Linux machine or server to your Android device, notify is just the tool for the job. It consists of two components: a simple Node.js-based command-line utility and an Android app. Assuming that Node.js is installed on your Linux machine, deploying the notify utility is a matter of running the npm install -g notify-cli command. And you can install the Android app from the Google Play Store. Once you've done that, you need to link the app and the command-line utility. Launch the Android app and note the generated identifier string. On the Linux machine, run the notify -r IDENTIFIER command, replacing...
Share Web Pages with the Dedicated Button in Firefox

Dec 16, 2015 GMT

The Share This Page button in the Mozilla Firefox browser is hidden by default -- which is a crying shame, as it offers an easy way to share the current web page through different services. To add this button to the browser's main toolbar, click on the hamburger button and choose Customize. Drag then the Share This Page icon to the desired location on the toolbar. Out of the box, the page sharing feature supports a handful of services, including Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Tumblr, and Yahoo! Mail. Activating the service you want is a matter of clicking on the appropriate icon. And you can enable multiple services, too. In addition to the...
Putting Context Menus in Nautilus to Practical Uses

Nov 30, 2015 GMT

Dolphin is not the only file browser that makes it possible to add custom commands to the context menu. If you happen to use Nautilus as your preferred file browser, you can add commands by placing executable scripts in the ~/.local/share/nautilus/scripts/ directory. In addition to popular languages like Python and Perl, you can use good old Bash to write scripts. When a script is called, Nautilus automatically sets a handful of variables that can be used in the script. Here is a simple Bash script that uses the mogrify tool to resize the currently selected image files: #!/bin/bash FILE=`echo $NAUTILUS_SCRIPT_SELECTED_URIS | sed 's@file://@@g'` mogrify -resize "1600x1600>"...

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