Detecting collisions in LÖVE games

Tutorial – LÖVE

Article from Issue 237/2020
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To create an action-packed game with LÖVE, these are a few last things you should learn how to do – overlay fancy images to "physical" objects, detect collisions, and get input from the keyboard or mouse.

LÖVE [1] is a Lua [2] framework that lets you develop fun 2D games relatively easily. We started talking about LÖVE and how to animate sprites in Linux Magazine, issue 234 [3], and went on to examine how to use the 2D physics engine to make things fall and bounce in issue 235 [4].

In this installment, you will see how to overlay PNG images to physical objects, check when they collide, and get input from the players. With these three things, you will be in a great place to start making your own games.

Let's get started!

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